3 Stages of Preboarding Build a Foundation for the Future
3 Stages of Preboarding Build a Foundation for the Future

3 Stages of Preboarding Build a Foundation for the Future

Getting a new hire off to a great start at your organization begins well before an employee’s first day at work. Paycor organizational development specialist Allison Flynn explains how the three stages of “preboarding” lay the groundwork for future success.

Stage 1: Effective recruitment

A new associate’s first impression starts during the recruiting process. It’s important to ensure that your branding message is consistent and true to your organization’s culture and that you clearly communicate the responsibilities of the role during this time. If you have a careers page online, make sure to include relevant information about your organization’s culture, goals and recent news to keep potential new hires engaged throughout the recruiting process.

For example, Paycor’s website includes a Careers page with information about our benefits and company culture, plus an employee spotlight. This section highlights some of our associates’ individual experiences at Paycor and gives candidates the chance to get a taste of who we are. Our website also includes sections on company news and important industry updates to keep candidates or recent hires well-informed.

Stage 2: Pre-start touchpoints

After you’ve extended an offer to your new associate, create touchpoints with him prior to his start date. Make sure any unanswered questions are addressed and your new hire is fully prepared for the first day.

At Paycor, we created a preboarding communication template that suggests pre-start talking points, such as: what time to arrive, what to bring, what to wear, what kind of schedule to expect on the first day and whether lunch will be provided. Some of these things are easily missed, but they make a big impression on a new hire’s first day. Remember: It’s all about creating that “welcome experience” and keeping new hires engaged before they start.

Stage 3: A welcoming first day

It can be helpful to create a checklist for hiring managers to complete prior to a new associate’s first day. It might seem small, but something as simple as not having the proper equipment on the first day can make a lasting negative impression. Make sure new hires feel expected and appreciated!

Consider having a welcome email waiting in your new associate’s inbox, and encourage your managers or team to take your new associate to lunch during the first week. Set up onboarding meetings with key stakeholders, and add the new associate to any upcoming or recurring meetings. Also, start scheduling frequent 1:1 meetings to facilitate communication.


Want to learn more about recruiting, hiring, onboarding and talent management? Check out Allison’s recent Paycor webinar, 6 Best Practices for Hiring Right, and read this helpful whitepaper, Employee Engagement: Why You Can’t Afford to Get It Wrong.

Paycor’s HR technology also makes it easier to hire, welcome and retain new employees with tools such as Applicant Tracking, HR Support Center and HR On-Demand. To learn more, contact a Paycor representative today.

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