4 Strategies for Impactful Organizational Effectiveness
4 Strategies for Impactful Organizational Effectiveness

4 Strategies for Impactful Organizational Effectiveness

Your talent is your organization’s competitive advantage. Are you doing everything you can to maximize it?

Tim Reed, CEO of Simplifi HR, recently conducted a Paycor webinar in which he outlined four strategies for impactful organizational effectiveness. And it all starts with people.

1. Find the right fit

Examine your work culture when you’re hiring, promoting or transferring. Most organizations don't pay enough attention to people in terms of their life experience and the value they bring. But everyone has certain talents and gifts! If they’re placed in the right positions, the organization will benefit.

To create the right person-job fit, think first about the key elements and requirements of the role. Write them down in a clear job description that outlines expectations, authority and consequences of failure to perform.

Also consider personality tendencies and placement. For example, do you want extroverts doing a lot of isolated computer work? Extroverts aren’t always outgoing, but they do tend to process information and communicate in certain ways. Assessments such as the Myers-Briggs test can help you understand how your teams think, learn and communicate, which will help your managers lead.

You need all types of individuals to make your products and services the best they can be. You also need to be able to meet the needs of all your employees.

2. Get the most out of your team

Your organization will rise and fall based on the discretionary effort given by your employees. Do you have teams that are willing to go above and beyond the basics for you?

Most people will withhold some effort based on factors such as how they feel about their supervisor or how they perceive the company's situation. If employees are uncertain about the future or fear possible cutbacks, their discretionary effort might dip.

That’s why strong organizational structure is critical. Your teams need to know who's in charge and what's expected, with clearly defined goals, a way to measure success and frequent opportunities to receive and offer feedback.

3. Establish the field of play

As a leader of people, you must minimize uncertainty as much as possible. That means clarifying responsibilities in a written format and defining authority guidelines. With no pronouncement of authority, there is no authority. And in that case, performance all goes back to discretionary effort.

Employees need to understand the consequences of going out of bounds. On the flip side, employees need to understand the basic question of our human nature: What’s in it for me?

When employees understand the ground rules, goals and ultimate benefits, they’re more likely to be on the bus with you.

But here’s a caveat: Once you establish those ground rules, you have to do what you say you will do.

4. Coach for peak performance

Coaching is what makes employees winners and then drives winners to greatness. It starts with setting expectations and then correcting issues as soon as they arise. The goal is to create a culture of coaching, in which employees—not just managers—buy in to the mission and vision and will step in to tell peers, “That’s not how we do things here.”

Such a culture is created when all employees are aligned with clear messages around where the organization is going and how it’s going to get there. That alignment is the result of an ongoing process of correction (when needed) and recognition—changing the bad and rewarding the good.

Of course, offering critical feedback can be difficult and uncomfortable, but it’s an absolutely necessary component to building a strong organization. Too much coaching tends to be done verbally and not written down. The best coaching is done in multiple one-on-one sessions that end in written notes that can become an agreement signed by both employee and supervisor. That document serves as a roadmap that makes plan the path to success.


How effectively is your organization managing its talent? To learn more from Tim Reed, download the webinar for free.

You also can explore how Paycor’s HR application, HR Support Center and Applicant Tracking tool can power your organization’s human resources and maximize your people potential.

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