5 Tips for Dealing with Difficult Employees
5 Tips for Dealing with Difficult Employees

5 Tips for Dealing with Difficult Employees

It’s inevitable. There’s always one bad apple.

No matter the industry or work environment, difficult employees are everywhere. It’s likely you’ll come face to face with one at some point in your career, whether that person is a peer who isn’t meeting company expectations or an employee of yours who isn’t getting along with others. Regardless of the circumstances, it’s best to confront the issue early.

Here are five tips managers should consider when faced with a difficult employee.

1. Be transparent.

If you have a problem with an employee, don’t ignore the issue. Too often, managers believe situations with problem employees will resolve themselves. The longer these problems persist, however, the more company morale and productivity is affected. As soon as you notice an employee is becoming a problem, you should document the issue. Create an improvement plan and work with the employee on how to implement the strategy. Yes, this will be an uncomfortable conversation, but approaching it with action items will turn the employee into an ally, not an adversary.

2. Keep detailed records.

If you’re experiencing problems with an employee, it is imperative to record all issues. Though you may think the employee will improve or their behavior will change, what happens if you’re wrong? You cannot take action and dismiss a troublesome employee without detailed information about what has gone wrong and what your response has been.

3. Maintain consistency.

Hold each employee to the same standards. If you expect all employees to be punctual, do not accept one person’s tardiness because you like or feel badly for them. Determine what behavior you won’t tolerate and don’t allow it to be acceptable some of the time. Employees notice if a coworker is receiving preferential treatment, and this can alienate your staff. Establish standards and stick to them.

4. Be professional.

You may want to share your frustrations about an employee to a colleague, but don’t fall into this trap. Revealing an issue like this can create a negative environment and eliminate trust between you and your employees. Good managers approach the employee in question and handle the issue without involving others.

5. Make tough decisions.

Don’t allow an employee to drain morale or company productivity. If the individual is obstinate and continues to cause problems even after you have tried to implement an improvement plan, you could be faced with a difficult decision. Take action when necessary.

_Does your company have any of these difficult employees? Paycor’s HR Support Center On Demand offers expert advice from certified HR professionals on how to manage your workforce. Click here to learn more, or let us explain the benefits in person

Related Articles:

Employee Engagement: Why You Can't Afford to Get It Wrong
5 Tips for Increasing Employee Engagement
4 Must-Haves for Your Performance Management Program

Source: Forbes

More to Discover

HR

Is Holiday Pay Mandatory In Your State?

Is Holiday Pay Mandatory In Your State?

The FLSA Only Requires Employers to Pay for Time Worked Unlike most of the European Union, the United States has no federal law requiring private companies to pay for national holiday time off (by law, all employees in the EU also get a minimum of 28 paid vacation days). The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires an employer to pay its employees only for time worked. This means that if an employee takes the day off for Christmas, you don’t have to pay them for time not worked. But Most Employers Offer Paid Holidays In practice, though, most private sector employers in the US give their employees the day off for national holidays, or they pay them time-and-a-half for working on the day. Some companies also offer a floating holiday,...

HR

The Different Types of Turnover

The Different Types of Turnover

Voluntary vs. Involuntary Turnover Regardless of business type there are two main types of employee turnover: voluntary and involuntary. Within each of those categories, however, you’ll find various reasons for why a company might have employee turnover. While the term “turnover” sometimes has a negative connotation, not all turnover is bad. For example, when a poorly performing employee is let go and replaced with someone who is motivated and excels at their job, productivity can soar. This new worker can bring bottom-line benefits, as well as provide an overall boost to team morale. What is involuntary turnover? Involuntary turnover includes layoffs or reductions in force and terminating poorly performing employees. The first type of...

Case Study: Cobb County Marietta Water Authority

Case Study: Cobb County Marietta Water Authority

With three disconnected HR systems, Cobb County Marietta Water Authority struggled with excessive data entry. Not only was this time consuming, it resulted in several errors each pay period, leading HR administrators to seek an integrated solution. “With Paycor, our employees never have to switch platforms, login to multiple systems, re-key information or open spreadsheets. By simplifying our everyday work processes we have time to focus on our mission.” - Allison Clements, Director of Finance, Cobb County Marietta Water Authority Paycor’s HR & Payroll solution gives CCMWA one location to process payroll and manage employee records. Instead of toggling between multiple screens, administrators can see a holistic view of data, reducing...

HR

Employees’ Rights for Jury Duty Leave

Employees’ Rights for Jury Duty Leave

Jury duty is foundational to our country’s judicial system. So, whether you’re in the, “Oh, no, I’ve got jury duty!” or the, “Awesome, I’ve got jury duty!” camp, as an employer, it’s important to understand the law. Your Responsibilities as an Employer Seem Clear Federal law does not require you to provide your employees leave for jury duty service nor does it provide for a specified period of leave, compensation or benefits. But it Gets Complicated Many states and municipalities prohibit employers from docking pay or paid time off when an employee is serving on a jury. Most of them also prohibit employers from firing or penalizing an employee for serving jury duty. And some states require you to pay an employee for time not worked as a...