The 5 C’s of Alternative Scheduling for Summer

The 5 C’s of Alternative Scheduling for Summer

The days get longer, the temperature gets hotter and being inside gets less and less appealing as employees glance longingly out their windows, yearning to get out and enjoy the summer sun. This season, employers are accommodating the widespread employee request for a more flexible summer schedule.

Whether it’s compressing a 40-hour week into four days instead of five, starting and ending the workday at times other than the traditional 9:00-5:00, or allowing employees to work from home to reduce long commutes and childcare costs, the implementation of summer work arrangements is becoming more popular. For example, Kraft Foods, Texas Instruments and First Tennessee Bank have all adopted alternative schedules during the warmer months.

Though proven to increase employee motivation, morale and retention, a flexible summer schedule must be implemented correctly—recognizing both the organization’s goals and employees’ needs. Following the 5 C’s of Alternative Scheduling will help you successfully implement a flexible schedule this summer:

  1. Create a detailed and comprehensive agreement that ensures employees will continue to get their work done despite flexible or reduced hours. The specifics of this schedule are between the employer and the employee, but should be clearly set and agreed upon in every case. Establishing clear policies protects against any negative effects on productivity.

  2. Be Consistent. If a flexible work schedule is available to one group of employees, it should be an option for all. One of the key goals of this system is to give employees a sense of control over their time in the summer months. However, limiting summer hour opportunities to a specific group may leave other workers feeling underappreciated—possibly undermining the overall positive effects of summer scheduling. In addition, once an alternative summer scheduling policy has been agreed upon, be sure to consistently follow it.

  3. Coordinate who takes advantage of their summer schedule and when they plan to be out of the office. Adequate staff needs to be available regardless of the season, and alternative hours cannot take a toll on overall productivity and customer satisfaction. Supervisors need to coordinate employee schedules to ensure work is still getting done.

  4. Communicate with employees to make sure everyone is on the same page with what is expected and what alternative schedule arrangements are allowed. Listening to what employees need is the key to drafting an alternative summer schedule that employees will appreciate and in turn, adhere to.

  5. Check in with employees taking advantage of the alternative summer schedule to make sure their work is getting done and their progress is on track. Performance should be monitored and reviewed closely when the alternative schedule is being used. Also, gather feedback as to how the alternative schedule is working and where there is room for improvement.

In addition to these five best practices, a flexible scheduling arrangement relies on the right technology for success. Paycor’s Time and Attendance offers accurate time tracking, employee scheduling, manager self-service and reports to give you visibility into how time is really being spent. A time and attendance system is a key element in making an alternative schedule work. Make sure you’re equipped with the right tools to implement a flexible schedule this summer: learn more by contacting us today.

Sources: Forbes, Rollins University, SHRM, The Wall Street Journal, HR Info Desk, Benefits Pro, Gazette.com, Flexible Workforce

More to Discover

BUILD Web Summit - Build a Competitive Compensation Plan

BUILD Web Summit - Build a Competitive Compensation Plan

Learn how to build a compensation plan that keeps you in line with the market and maintains compliance. Speaker: Christine Ippolito Christine Ippolito, SPHR, SHRM-SCP is the Founder and Principal of Compass Workforce Solutions, LLC, a consulting firm providing strategic human resource expertise to small businesses to reduce exposure and increase profitability. She has served clients in a leadership capacity for 25 years in multiple industries and environments within Fortune 250, venture capital and equity-backed companies, as well as privately held and family-owned businesses.

BUILD Web Summit - Build a Compelling Benefits Package

BUILD Web Summit - Build a Compelling Benefits Package

Learn how to build benefits by assessing culture, segmenting the population and utilizing benchmark reports to determine the best options for your organization. We will also discuss how benefits have grown from foundational to experiential and the latest pillars of wellbeing. Speaker: Andrea Toben Andrea has 15 years in Human Resources and Operations management with extensive knowledge in strategic benefit plan design focused on cost savings, competitiveness, and employee satisfaction with enthusiasm toward developing a culture of wellbeing and consumerism. Experienced in regulatory compliance, communications & employee engagement, wellness program implementation, vendor relations, retirement plans. Her experience also includes...

5 Steps to a Highly Effective Employee Benefits Strategy

5 Steps to a Highly Effective Employee Benefits Strategy

Companies that offer strategic benefits perform 24% better than ones that don’t, recruit 8% more effectively and are 17% more likely to retain employees. But selecting the right benefits mix isn’t “cut and paste” – there’s no one-size-fits-all solve. Your workforce is diverse and multigenerational; your employees want and need different things. Discover the 5 key steps to designing a employee benefits strategy that drives recruiting, retention and business results.

EEO Compliance: Are You Prepared to File the Updated EEO-1 Report?

EEO Compliance: Are You Prepared to File the Updated EEO-1 Report?

On April 25, 2019 a federal judge announced a ruling that will require employers to collect 2018 employee pay data and hours worked by race, ethnicity and gender and submit it to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) by September 30, 2019. On May 1, 2019, the EEOC decided that they will collect 2017 pay data in addition to the 2018 pay data that was previously announced. The EEOC is expected to open the portal for employers to submit 2017 and 2018 pay data beginning on July 15, 2019. Note: Employers are still required to submit component 1 of the EEO-1 form by May 31, 2019. What are the new EEO-1 reporting requirements? The current EEO-1 form requires company employment data to be categorized by race, ethnicity, gender and...