The Turnover Crisis in Manufacturing
The Turnover Crisis in Manufacturing

The Turnover Crisis in Manufacturing

An action plan for all HR and finance leaders

It’s no secret—manufacturing is losing talent. As Baby Boomers leave the workforce and take valuable skills with them, it’s expected that nearly 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will open up by 2025. Two million of those jobs are expected to go unfilled because of the skills gap*.

The longer positions go unfilled, the more the production process is disrupted. Company morale starts to decline, and manufacturers see profits dip as they’re unable to operate at full capacity. Automation and robotics may help fill some of the labor gap, but HR still needs to find humans to problem solve, analyze issues and manage output.

If you’re trying to recruit in the manufacturing industry, you’re in a vicious cycle. Talent is leaving and they’re hard to replace. Younger people are less interested in so called “blue collar” work than previous generations. And many people incorrectly assume the industry isn’t modern or innovative, causing concern over the stability of a manufacturing career.

Download the guide to learn more about the turnover crisis in manufacturing and discover an action plan for your organization.

*Source: Deloitte/Manufacturing Institute study

Fight the turnover crisis in manufacturing.

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