Ban the Box: State-by-State
Ban the Box: State-by-State

Ban the Box: State-by-State

One in Three American Adults Have a Criminal History

In the past, having a criminal history prevented some potentially great job candidates from being hired, regardless of how long ago the crime took place, how minor the infraction was, or how good of a fit they might be for the role. When you consider that an estimated 70 million Americans—one in three Americans who are of working age—have some kind of criminal history, it’s not difficult to understand how requiring a squeaky-clean record could become problematic for some jobs.

Even People Without Convictions Can Be Discriminated Against

Many criminal background checks fail to distinguish between someone being arrested or charged and actually being convicted. Potential employees are routinely asked on job applications if they’ve “ever been arrested for a serious crime.” Not if they have a conviction history…simply arrested. It’s easy to see how checking “yes” on this box could be used to take some candidates out of the running for a job. This is exactly the reason why many states and localities are passing laws to protect job hunters who have a criminal record from being immediately disqualified during the hiring process.

What is a “Ban the Box” Law?

A “ban the box” law prohibits employers from requesting a potential employee’s criminal history on a job application in certain states and localities. Some laws forbid a company from asking if the candidate was ever sentenced for a crime until a specific time in the hiring process, such as during an interview or after a conditional offer of employment.

Ban the Box Is Good for Children and Families

Colorado is one of the most recent states with laws requiring employers to ban the box with its Colorado Chance to Compete Act (CCCA). They, like other states that have implemented the ban, found that,

“Previous involvement with the criminal justice system often creates a significant barrier to employment in that applicants with criminal histories are less likely to be considered for an available job when that information is included on an initial job application... Children and families suffer when people with criminal histories are unable to work or work at jobs that are below their potential given their education and skills….”

Additionally, including a criminal history question on an application often results in disparate impact discrimination. Because Latino and African American men are arrested and convicted at a higher rate than Caucasian men, an employment application asking about criminal history has a disproportionate impact on them.

Credit Checks Can Also Be Considered a Discriminatory Act

Several states also have laws that prevent an employer from using a person’s credit history to make employment decisions. A credit history background check can also be lumped under “disparate impact discrimination” as it can have a negative impact on women and minorities. These two groups are more likely to experience bankruptcies or have poor credit reports. Generally, states that have credit check restrictions allow for one if the job in question is for a financial institution or where the applicant would otherwise have access to financial data.

Ban the Box Laws: By States and Cities and Counties

Here’s a quick snap shot of the U.S. and which states have banned the box. For a deeper dive into a specific state, check out the chart below.

state laws for ban the box

State  Municipality  Covered Employers  Notes 
Alabama    No Law   
Alaska  No Law   
Arizona    Now Law   
Arkansas    No Law   
California    Employers with 5+ employees   No criminal background check until after a job offer  
  Compton   Contractors doing business with Compton   No criminal background check until after a job offer  
  Los Angeles   Any employer with 10+ employees   No criminal background check until after a job offer  
  Richmond   Private sector employers with 10+ employees that have contracts with Richmond regardless of where employer is based    
  San Francisco   Employers with 5+ employees   No criminal background check until after a job offer  
Colorado    Effective 9/1/19 for employers with 11+ employees; effective on or after 9/1/21 for all employers   
Connecticut    All employers  No criminal history question on job applications with some exceptions  
  Hartford   Contractors doing business with Hartford   No background check until after job offer  
  New Haven   Contractors doing business with New Haven   No background check until after job offer  
Delaware    No Law   
District of Columbia    Employers with 11+ employees  No background check until after job offer 
Florida    No Law   
Georgia    No Law    
Hawaii    All private employers  No criminal background check until after job offer  
Idaho    No Law   
Illinois    Private employers with 15+ employees  No criminal background check before job interview, or until after job offer if no interview  
  Chicago   Private employers with fewer than 15 employees   No criminal background check before job interview, or until after job offer if no interview  
  Cook County   Private employers with fewer than 15 employees   No criminal background check before job interview, or until after job offer if no interview  
Indiana    No Law   
  Indianapolis   Contractors doing business with Indianapolis   Criminal history questions only after first interview  
Iowa    No Law   
Kansas    No Law   
Kentucky    No Law    
  Louisville   Contractors doing business with Louisville   City may end contracts with companies that do not ban the box  
Louisiana    No Law   
  New Orleans   Contractors doing business with New Orleans   No criminal history questions on job applications  
Maine    No Law   
Maryland    No Law   
  Baltimore   Employers with 10+ employees   No background check until after job offer  
  Montgomery County   Employers with 15+ employees   No criminal history questions or checks until after first interview  
  Prince George’s County   Employers with 25+ full-time employees   No criminal history questions or checks until after first interview  
Massachusetts    All private employers   No criminal history questions on application. Also bans questions about certain types of crimes later in the hiring process.  
  Boston   Contractors/vendors doing business with Boston    
  Cambridge   Contractors/vendors doing business with Cambridge    
  Worcester   Contractors/vendors doing business with Worcester    
Michigan    Employers with 15+ employees    
  Detroit   Contractors doing business with Detroit when contract is $25,000+   No questions about criminal convictions until interview or qualification  
  Kalamazoo   Contractors doing business with Kalamazoo when contract is $25,000+ or those seeking tax abatement   Must commit to not use criminal history to discriminate  
Minnesota    All private employers  No criminal history inquiries on job application with limited exceptions  
Mississippi    No Law   
Missouri    No Law    
  Columbia   All employers in Columbia   No criminal history check until after conditional job offer  
  Kansas City   Private employers with six+ employees   No criminal history check until after job interview  
Montana    No Law   
Nebraska    No Law   
Nevada    No Law   
New Hampshire    No Law   
New Jersey    Employers with 15+ employees over 20 calendar weeks   Preempts local laws  
New Mexico    All private employers  Can consider a conviction after reviewing an application and discussing employment with the applicant  
New York    No Law   
  Buffalo   Private employers with 15+ employees/contractors doing business with Buffalo   No criminal history questions on job applications  
  New York City   All employers with 4+ employees   No criminal background check prior to conditional job offer  
  Rochester   All employers with 4+ employees and contractors doing business with Rochester   Criminal background check only after initial job interview or conditional job offer  
  Syracuse   City contractors   No background checks until after conditional job offer  
North Carolina    No Law   
North Dakota    No Law   
Ohio    No Law    
Oklahoma    No Law   
Oregon    All private employers   Illegal to exclude applicant from an interview solely due to past criminal conviction  
  Portland   Employers with 6+ employees   No criminal background check prior to conditional job offer  
Pennsylvania    No Law    
  Philadelphia   All employers with at least one employee in Philadelphia   No criminal background check prior to conditional job offer  
  Pittsburgh   Contractors/vendors doing business with Pittsburgh   No criminal history check before applicant is deemed otherwise qualified  
Rhode Island    Employers with 4+ employees  No criminal background check on job applications  
South Carolina    No Law   
South Dakota    No Law   
Tennessee    No Law   
Texas    No Law   
  Austin   Employers with 15+ employees   No criminal background check prior to conditional job offer  
Utah    No Law   
Vermont    All private employers   No criminal history questions on job application  
Virginia  No Law    
Washington    All private employers  No criminal history check before applicant is deemed otherwise qualified  
  Seattle   All employers with 1+ employees   Must have a legitimate business reason to automatically exclude applicants with arrest or conviction records  
  Spokane   All private employers   No criminal history questions before a job interview  
West Virginia  No Law    
Wisconsin    No Law   
  Madison   Contractors doing business with Madison on contracts worth $25,000+   No criminal history questions or background checks until after conditional job offer  
Wyoming    No Law   

How Paycor Helps

We’re proud to keep more than 30,000 organizations informed about and compliant with federal and state laws and regulations. Want to see how Paycor can help you mitigate risk? Check out our article on hiring compliance, or talk to a Paycor representative.

The information provided in our chart is for educational purposes only; it is not legal advice. Always check regulations to help ensure compliance.


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