The Turnover Crisis in Healthcare
The Turnover Crisis in Healthcare

The Turnover Crisis in Healthcare

An action plan for finance and HR leaders

With an aging population, more chronic illnesses and many nurses nearing retirement, the demand for their skilled replacements is outpacing the supply at an alarming rate. In fact, nearly a quarter of healthcare providers reported having nursing vacancies greater than 10% in 2018*.

Unemployment rates are at the lowest they’ve been in decades, which makes the search for qualified talent and filling open job positions more difficult than ever. The demand for healthcare isn’t going to diminish, so it’s important to partner with an HCM provider who can help solve your HR challenges with the proper technology and expertise.

Nearly 6,000 healthcare providers depend on Paycor for solutions regarding employee turnover, compliance and the nursing shortage. Why? Because we understand the top problems in your industry and want to give you the tools to help you shorten the time to fill open positions, strengthen your candidate pipeline, track training programs and more.

Download the guide to learn more about the turnover crisis in healthcare.

*Source: NSI Nursing Solutions, 2018 RN Labor Market Update

Discover an action plan for your organization.

More to Discover

HR

Is Holiday Pay Mandatory In Your State?

Is Holiday Pay Mandatory In Your State?

The FLSA Only Requires Employers to Pay for Time Worked Unlike most of the European Union, the United States has no federal law requiring private companies to pay for national holiday time off (by law, all employees in the EU also get a minimum of 28 paid vacation days). The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires an employer to pay its employees only for time worked. This means that if an employee takes the day off for Christmas, you don’t have to pay them for time not worked. But Most Employers Offer Paid Holidays In practice, though, most private sector employers in the US give their employees the day off for national holidays, or they pay them time-and-a-half for working on the day. Some companies also offer a floating holiday,...

HR

The Different Types of Turnover

The Different Types of Turnover

Voluntary vs. Involuntary Turnover Regardless of business type there are two main types of employee turnover: voluntary and involuntary. Within each of those categories, however, you’ll find various reasons for why a company might have employee turnover. While the term “turnover” sometimes has a negative connotation, not all turnover is bad. For example, when a poorly performing employee is let go and replaced with someone who is motivated and excels at their job, productivity can soar. This new worker can bring bottom-line benefits, as well as provide an overall boost to team morale. What is involuntary turnover? Involuntary turnover includes layoffs or reductions in force and terminating poorly performing employees. The first type of...

Case Study: Cobb County Marietta Water Authority

Case Study: Cobb County Marietta Water Authority

With three disconnected HR systems, Cobb County Marietta Water Authority struggled with excessive data entry. Not only was this time consuming, it resulted in several errors each pay period, leading HR administrators to seek an integrated solution. “With Paycor, our employees never have to switch platforms, login to multiple systems, re-key information or open spreadsheets. By simplifying our everyday work processes we have time to focus on our mission.” - Allison Clements, Director of Finance, Cobb County Marietta Water Authority Paycor’s HR & Payroll solution gives CCMWA one location to process payroll and manage employee records. Instead of toggling between multiple screens, administrators can see a holistic view of data, reducing...

HR

Employees’ Rights for Jury Duty Leave

Employees’ Rights for Jury Duty Leave

Jury duty is foundational to our country’s judicial system. So, whether you’re in the, “Oh, no, I’ve got jury duty!” or the, “Awesome, I’ve got jury duty!” camp, as an employer, it’s important to understand the law. Your Responsibilities as an Employer Seem Clear Federal law does not require you to provide your employees leave for jury duty service nor does it provide for a specified period of leave, compensation or benefits. But it Gets Complicated Many states and municipalities prohibit employers from docking pay or paid time off when an employee is serving on a jury. Most of them also prohibit employers from firing or penalizing an employee for serving jury duty. And some states require you to pay an employee for time not worked as a...