How to Create the Ideal Employee Experience
How to Create the Ideal Employee Experience

How to Create the Ideal Employee Experience

All companies covet an engaged, motivated workforce. When your people are engaged, they don’t behave like an average employee. They’re more like committed volunteers devoted to a mission, always seeking new opportunities to boost morale and make a difference. It’s no surprise then that, according to DecisionWise, in 2017, 73% of executives said employee engagement was a top concern. Yet Gallup’s annual survey of engagement continually finds that only 1/3 of employees are engaged at work. Most (51%) are not engaged and, even worse, 16% are actively disengaged. With so many companies focused on engagement, why don’t we see better results?

A primary reason is that not all companies focus on the employee experience. Everything from onboarding to coaching to career development is essential to steadily build an employee-centric culture. Over the years, we’ve seen examples of companies taking shortcuts and only scratching the surface. Providing lunch, happy hours, flexible working arrangements, or, if all else fails, setting up a ping pong table in a conference room are nice gestures, but these “perks” seldom produce lasting results. There’s a better way, and it’s up to HR to lead the way.

From nervous first day jitters to fully engaged active team membership, the journey of employee engagement can be shaped by HR, if you have an end goal in mind. Here’s how to do it.

Check out the infographic below to learn more.

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