4 Tips for Nonprofit HR Management
4 Tips for Nonprofit HR Management

4 Tips for Nonprofit HR Management

Employee satisfaction and retention are crucial for the success of any organization, but they’re particularly important within the non-profit sector, which is known for attracting highly committed employees and volunteers who are motivated by mission.

Nonprofit HR managers must ensure that they’re maximizing their employees’ energy and enthusiasm to keep turnover low and engagement high. Here are four tips for doing exactly that:

1. Make HR strategy part of the overall organizational strategy

Talent recruitment and retention should be measured and framed as part of over-arching organizational goals. HR managers must show how keeping a driven, skilled staff affects the bottom line in terms of both dollars saved and dollars generated. It’s also important for nonprofit HR managers to effectively integrate paid staff with volunteer labor by clarifying roles and expectations and facilitating collaboration between both groups.

2. Offer competitive salaries and benefits

Although employees might be drawn to an organization on principle, they need to be rewarded with a total benefits package that makes them feel valued. Accurate, complete job descriptions will help HR leaders develop appropriate compensation packages and will make it easier to compare an organization’s offerings to those of other similar nonprofits.

3. Ensure opportunities for learning

Employees—especially Millennials—in any sector seek and even expect the chance to develop new skills, regardless of the size of their organization. Whether through formal training via LMS systems, workshops or job shadowing and cross-training, HR should design and encourage opportunities for employees to grow beyond their current positions. This improves job satisfaction and also makes succession planning easier for future change.

4. Collect and analyze complete, accurate data

HR managers need a system that allows them to track updated information for all workers, whether full-time, part-time, paid or unpaid. Such information includes hours worked, to ensure compliance with legislation and tax regulations, as well as training, certifications, licenses and continuing education credits. This helps ensure that employees’ and volunteers’ skills are aligned with their passion for your organization’s purpose.

Learn more about how to engage employees throughout their careers at your organization. Download the whitepaper Employee Engagement: Why You Can’t Afford to Get it Wrong.

You can find out more about how Paycor can help nonprofit HR professionals more strategically and efficiently manage their employees and volunteers through our suite of solutions, including:

* A robust applicant tracking system that streamlines the hiring process and prevents you from missing out on top talent
* A human resource management application that provides tools for training administration, document archiving and employee communication through a secure portal
* An HR Support Center that includes sample documentation for performance reviews, job descriptions and numerous other useful forms
* Custom reporting that allows HR and organizational leaders to compile and analyze data quickly
* Time and attendance tools that allow you to view and change employees’ and volunteers’ schedules and generate custom reports to track hours worked

Get in touch with Paycor to learn more about how these solutions can empower your organization to focus on your mission.


Source: The NonProfit Times


subscribe to Paycor's Resource Center

Subscribe to Our Resource Center Digest

Enter your email below to receive a weekly recap of the latest articles from Paycor's Resource Center.

Check your inbox for an email confirming your subscription. Enjoy!

More to Discover

HR

Are Domestic Partner Benefits Mandatory?

Are Domestic Partner Benefits Mandatory?

A Brief History: Only What You Need to Know The roots of domestic partner benefits stretch way back to 1982, when the City of San Francisco enacted legislation to offer health insurance coverage to the same or opposite sex partners of its unmarried employees. “Domestic partner” soon became the official legal term used by insurers and private and public employers. Also, in 1982, New York City newspaper The Village Voice became the first private employer to offer domestic partner health care benefits. Many other companies and municipalities followed suit. Fast forward to more than 30 years later when, in 2015, the United States Supreme Court ruled that domestic partner benefits apply to both same-sex and unmarried opposite-sex couples....

Banker

3 Reasons CFOs Should Care About Employee Benefits

3 Reasons CFOs Should Care About Employee Benefits

If you think the realm of employee benefits is strictly HR’s domain, it’s time to change your thinking. Labor costs, including employee benefits, is often the largest expense of any organization and should be closely watched by both HR and finance. More financial leaders are taking an interest in human resources and starting to expand their influence outside the traditional areas of accounting. A recent Robert Half survey showed CFOs are more likely to expand their reach into HR more than any other department. 39% of CFOs said their role expanded into HR the most Source: Robert Half If you’re hands-off when it comes to employee benefits, it’s time to get his/her attention. Here are three reasons why a CFO should care: A Healthy Workforce...

CFO

5 Cost-Containment Strategies to Make Benefits a Competitive Advantage

5 Cost-Containment Strategies to Make Benefits a Competitive Advantage

A diverse mix of benefits are one of the most critical tools employers can offer to attract top talent—but companies can’t ignore the impact benefits have on retention. Still, some financial leaders hesitate to invest in a variety of benefits packages due to the costs involved. Paycor analyzed more than 30,000 medium and small businesses and found that as organizations offer more benefit plans, there’s a substantial improvement in turnover. Specifically, organizations offering six benefit plan types saw turnover improve 138%. Check out our infographic below which examines five cost-containment strategies CFOs should consider to avoid breaking the bank.

Communicating Benefits to a Multigenerational Workforce

Communicating Benefits to a Multigenerational Workforce

Your clients spend $11.60/hr. (on average) per employee on benefits, which represents a huge investment for small and mid-sized businesses (Bureau of Labor Statistics). But as you know, there’s also an investment of time; think of the many hours you spend guiding your clients through the process of crafting a benefits strategy that addresses the needs of the 5 generations in the workforce. But here’s the problem: if a tree falls in the woods, does anyone hear it? If open enrollment is confusing for your clients, imagine how their employees feel. Without the right education, employees stick with the benefits they know, and they may never know that there was a better option for them. According to Aflac, 46% of Americans take less than 30...