4 Tips for Resolving Workplace Conflicts

4 Tips for Resolving Workplace Conflicts

Occasional conflicts are an inevitable part of working with people. While effectively resolved conflicts can strengthen a team, unsettled issues can become cancerous and poison your corporate culture and employee engagement. Here are four tips for making the most of any conflict mediation you may have to deal with.

1. Realize the problem won’t just go away

Ignoring workplace conflicts won’t make them go away: it will turn them into a ticking time bomb. While the problem may seem to subside on its own, without mediation, it will reemerge and explode the next time that stress or conflict arises. Healthy relationships, personal and professional, are built on trust and communication, and without a definite resolution, neither of those exist.

2. Understand it’s a group problem

Because a conflict involves more than one person, it needs to be dealt with as a group. Sitting down with the antagonists together will streamline the mediation process and eliminate any he-said-she-said misunderstandings. Additionally, any workplace conflict affects more than just the two people having the dispute. Bystanders often get dragged into the mix, forced into choosing one side or the other; with your whole team invested in the argument, efficiency and employee engagement will suffer a heavy blow.

3. Know the manager’s role

The manager has a vitally important role to play in the conflict mediation process: facilitating dialogue. Let your employees know that you believe they can resolve the conflict effectively (like adults) and their compromise and understanding is important to you. Furthermore, recognize that you need to own some of the responsibility for the issue. Ask if there’s something your workplace could have done to prevent this dispute and what you can do to prevent future problems.

4. Discuss real changes

Gather all participants in the dispute to sit down and calmly discuss what each person needs to work effectively again. Talk about real actions that can be taken to improve the workplace and fix the problems, rather than just dishing out criticism. When everyone’s opinion is heard and a plan is set in place, the result is more likely to be an efficient and encouraging workplace.

Conflict mediation is a very real part of being a manager. It’s the manager’s job to keep the workplace running smoothly and to take care of his team. By effectively dealing with conflicts, you and your employees can once again fulfill your roles driving company success.



For more ways to make your company run smoothly, subscribe to Paycor’s free monthly e-newsletter with articles and webinars on HR, compliance, and other topics to keep you up-to-date.


_Source: Susan Heathfield

More to Discover

HR

Is Holiday Pay Mandatory In Your State?

Is Holiday Pay Mandatory In Your State?

The FLSA Only Requires Employers to Pay for Time Worked Unlike most of the European Union, the United States has no federal law requiring private companies to pay for national holiday time off (by law, all employees in the EU also get a minimum of 28 paid vacation days). The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires an employer to pay its employees only for time worked. This means that if an employee takes the day off for Christmas, you don’t have to pay them for time not worked. But Most Employers Offer Paid Holidays In practice, though, most private sector employers in the US give their employees the day off for national holidays, or they pay them time-and-a-half for working on the day. Some companies also offer a floating holiday,...

HR

The Different Types of Turnover

The Different Types of Turnover

Voluntary vs. Involuntary Turnover Regardless of business type there are two main types of employee turnover: voluntary and involuntary. Within each of those categories, however, you’ll find various reasons for why a company might have employee turnover. While the term “turnover” sometimes has a negative connotation, not all turnover is bad. For example, when a poorly performing employee is let go and replaced with someone who is motivated and excels at their job, productivity can soar. This new worker can bring bottom-line benefits, as well as provide an overall boost to team morale. What is involuntary turnover? Involuntary turnover includes layoffs or reductions in force and terminating poorly performing employees. The first type of...

Case Study: Cobb County Marietta Water Authority

Case Study: Cobb County Marietta Water Authority

With three disconnected HR systems, Cobb County Marietta Water Authority struggled with excessive data entry. Not only was this time consuming, it resulted in several errors each pay period, leading HR administrators to seek an integrated solution. “With Paycor, our employees never have to switch platforms, login to multiple systems, re-key information or open spreadsheets. By simplifying our everyday work processes we have time to focus on our mission.” - Allison Clements, Director of Finance, Cobb County Marietta Water Authority Paycor’s HR & Payroll solution gives CCMWA one location to process payroll and manage employee records. Instead of toggling between multiple screens, administrators can see a holistic view of data, reducing...

HR

Employees’ Rights for Jury Duty Leave

Employees’ Rights for Jury Duty Leave

Jury duty is foundational to our country’s judicial system. So, whether you’re in the, “Oh, no, I’ve got jury duty!” or the, “Awesome, I’ve got jury duty!” camp, as an employer, it’s important to understand the law. Your Responsibilities as an Employer Seem Clear Federal law does not require you to provide your employees leave for jury duty service nor does it provide for a specified period of leave, compensation or benefits. But it Gets Complicated Many states and municipalities prohibit employers from docking pay or paid time off when an employee is serving on a jury. Most of them also prohibit employers from firing or penalizing an employee for serving jury duty. And some states require you to pay an employee for time not worked as a...