4 Ways to Re-recruit and Retain Your Employees

4 Ways to Re-recruit and Retain Your Employees

Even the most dedicated employees can become vulnerable at work. They can get bored, feel taken for granted or wonder where their careers are headed.

That’s why HR pros and business owners know the concept of re-recruitment is so important—think of it as a “renewing of vows” between the associate and the organization.

Paycor Chief HR Officer Karen Crone addressed this topic in a recent webinar and offered four best practices for re-recruiting your employees.

1. Conduct a flight-risk assessment

Understanding your people risks is more art than science, but even though it can be hard to quantify, it’s critical to assess your team’s stability by looking at factors such as morale, tenure, peer relationships and behavior patterns. Dig into what you’re seeing and determine if an employee’s risk level of departure is high, medium or low.

Next, analyze the impact of an employee’s departure. If an associate leaves, what do you lose and what is the threat to your organization? Consider the importance of the role or function, any specialized skills and the number of incumbents for the position.

Again, rate the impact as high, medium or low and then put specific emphasis toward employees who are high-risk and high-impact.

2. Take the temperature

When you’ve identified a high-risk, high-impact associate, schedule some 1:1 interviews. Ask the employee questions such as:

* What do you like?
* What are you good at that you’re not doing?
* What questions do you have about the company’s direction?
* What obstacles do you face?
* How can we make things better for you?

In these kinds of conversations, you uncover problem-solving opportunities or career concerns. From there, a simple action plan created jointly can help the employee re-engage and feel cared for. To maintain that engagement, conduct periodic career check-ins. Remember: When an associate knows you care, he’s more likely to stay!

Also consider scheduling “skip-level booster shots,” meetings for the employee with the leader above the employee’s supervisor. This added visibility and high-touch approach demonstrates that the organization is truly invested in the associate.

3. Re-energize the workplace!

To keep all employees more engaged, take real action. Good intentions don’t move the needle!

Remember to offer routine recognition routinely. It sounds simple, but it’s commonly overlooked.

Unexpected forms of recognition are especially impactful, such as an impromptu meal, a reward that extends to the employee’s family or a visit to the associate’s workstation to deliver a personal message after a big win.

Changing the energy level of the workplace also boosts engagement. Consider starting the day with a 10-minute, standing huddle to keep everyone on their toes—literally and figuratively. You also might offer a sabbatical day during which you allow an employee to take a work day to get away and study a topic of interest outside of normal work duties.

4. Prepare the "Stay Offer"

In today’s work environment, it’s only a matter of time before an associate, especially a young professional, breaks your heart by handing in a resignation letter. The key is not to respond emotionally but instead to be ready to counter.

Of course, if you’re willing to invest in an employee after she’s ready to leave, why not invest now?

Take a look at your flight-risk assessments and determine what you’re willing to do to keep each associate. Could you offer a raise, promotion or transfer? Could you provide more training, more responsibility or greater visibility?

Being proactive in your re-recruitment and retention will save you the time, stress and money associated with recruiting new hires.

Are you interested in learning more about effective talent management? Download the complete webinar, 6 Tips for Recruiting and Retention.

You also can subscribe to our monthly “Industry Insights” e-newsletter, in which you’ll find practical thought leadership articles, as well as important tax and legislation updates, right in your inbox!

More to Discover

Case Study: Boulder Country Club

Case Study: Boulder Country Club

Paycor’s enhanced implementation service model creates a fast start for Boulder Country Club. “The transition to Paycor has been amazing. The hands-on guidance and support they offered during implementation saved us so much time. Paycor took control of the entire process so I could focus on other things.” - Amber Maranya, HR Director, Boulder Country Club Prior to Paycor Boulder Country Club is a private club that serves 850 members across northern Colorado and offers everything from golf and tennis to fitness and swimming. Their previous HR & payroll platform was designed for small businesses and couldn’t easily track hours worked for commissioned employees. After evaluating multiple well-known providers, HR Director Amber Maranya...

If an Employee Tests Positive for COVID-19, Here’s What to Do

If an Employee Tests Positive for COVID-19, Here’s What to Do

Everyone needs a plan to fall back on if and when an employee gets sick or tests positive for COVID-19. Below you'll find the step-by-step guide on how your company should proceed if one of your employees tests positive for Coronavirus.Get Communication Letter Template to Use if Employee Tests Positive for COVID-19 6 Steps To Take If an Employee Tests Positive for COVID-19 Offer Support We’re all moving fast in this new world and it can feel like we’re flying blind, so this is just a reminder of what you already know: if an employee lets you know they’ve tested positive for COVID-19, take a moment to be there for them. As a leader of your company, there are of course professional limitations of what “being there” means—you won’t be able...

Emergency Sick Leave for Childcare: What Employers Need to Know About FFCRA

Emergency Sick Leave for Childcare: What Employers Need to Know About FFCRA

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) is a big part of the government response to the current public health crisis, offering emergency sick leave and paid family medical leave to those affected by Coronavirus. Take a look at our guide on managing employee leave scenarios.The FFRCA doesn’t just apply to employees who are directly affected by the virus—those who are infected, caring for the infected or quarantined. It also puts in place measures for the parents or guardians of children whose schools or day care facilities are closed due to the pandemic.These measures will apply from April 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020. How Does the FFCRA Work for Parents? If an employee has been on payroll for at least 30 days and cannot...

Essential Business Letter (Template)

Essential Business Letter (Template)

Many states and cities are imposing complete or partial lockdowns, with most businesses forced to temporarily shut their doors or move to remote work and only “essential businesses” unaffected. This has left many employers and employees asking what exactly counts as an essential business.Download Essential Business Letter Template What Counts as an Essential Business? On March 19, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA, overseen by the Department of Homeland Security) issued guidance on what business count as critical infrastructure. Some businesses are obviously essential—hospitals, pharmacies and law enforcement. The list is extensive—other essential businesses include stores selling supplies which allow people to...