6 Best Practices for Hiring Seasonal Workers
6 Best Practices for Hiring Seasonal Workers

6 Best Practices for Hiring Seasonal Workers

Summer is the peak season for many businesses, from tourism to landscaping to moving companies. Ensuring adequate staff can be a challenge, especially if resources are limited. To help you get through the peak season, here are six best practices for hiring seasonal labor:

1. Plan for peak times and hire early
It’s important to start planning for your peak season early so you have enough time for the recruiting and hiring process. Early planning means you can hit the ground running and have first pick of the best talent.

2. Leverage multiple hiring sources
While many companies use staffing consultants to hire their seasonal staff, this can be an expensive option. Make use of other, less expensive sources of seasonal labor, including past employees, friends or family of current employees, students and retirees.

3. Don’t skimp on training
Just because seasonal hires are temporary doesn’t mean you should not train them on your product or service, their job duties or your organizational culture. Many companies hope their seasonal employees will learn on the job, but placing a brand new, untrained employee on the front lines of a peak-season rush could lead to low productivity, unhappy customers and a disgruntled worker. Remember: your customers will hold your part-time and seasonal workers to the same standards as any other employee.

4. Use incentives for retention
Regardless of the economy, seasonal employees tend to have high turnover. Consider putting incentives in place that will increase retention, lowering your total labor costs. Examples include bonuses, discounts on company goods or services, access to development programs for regular employees or preference when it comes to hiring for long-term positions.

5. Consider long-term options
A temporary hire may have the potential to become a full-time employee. Since you’ve already put in the time and effort to train them, why resign yourself to letting them walk out the door at the end of the season? Keep an eye on your temporary workers to identify their potential for long-term employment.

6. Remember that the rules still apply
When it comes to temporary labor, there’s a temptation for employers to be lax in their enforcement of standard HR policies. This attitude can result in serious and costly consequences, like non-compliance with labor laws and regulations.

In addition to these six best practices, it’s also a good idea to make sure you have the right HR and time tracking technology in place to drive a successful peak season and reduce your risk of non-compliance. From Applicant Tracking to Time and Attendance to Custom Web Reporting, Paycor offers a range of solutions to help you hire employees, schedule their shifts, track their hours and report on labor costs. These are also helpful tools to ensure you are compliant with the EEOC, the Department of Labor and other government regulations. Learn more by contacting a Paycor representative today.

Source: Bright Hub PM

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