Culture Is the New Job Perk
Culture Is the New Job Perk

Culture Is the New Job Perk

Think back to what initially drew you to the job you currently hold. What was it that made you apply in the first place? Did something in particular get you to accept the job offer when it was extended to you?

Job perks come in many forms—certainly, salary and monetary benefits are a big draw (since that’s why we work in the first place), but there are plenty of other factors ranging from the mundane to the moral. Workplace culture is a concept that includes many of those factors and it is emerging as one of the most powerful influencers for bringing new talent into your company.

Corporate culture—your company’s identity

Google (the company, not the search engine) comes to mind for many people when they think of a fun workplace environment. Images of meetings conducted in beanbag chairs, dogs coming to work, and rooms full of programmers gathered at ping pong tables are the better-known examples, but they are each simply aspects of a larger corporate culture.

An appealing, inviting corporate culture doesn’t just come from having game rooms—it’s a reflection of the philosophy and values your business holds. The more defined those things are and the better they’re demonstrated in the attitude and environment of the workplace, the more effectively they will draw in candidates who fit the ethos.

Accomplishing that means using the culture as the basis for your employment brand. Highlighting your current employees and what they enjoy about working there is the best way to get your culture out there to potential hires. It gives candidates a clear idea of what working there is like ahead of time and serves as a differentiator to make your company stand out from the crowd.

Appealing to today's top talent

So, what is it that job seekers want from a workplace culture?

First, it’s important not to change your identity or philosophy to be trendy. If your company is mostly concerned with manufacturing, for example, it may not be the best idea to have puppies running around everywhere.

That being said, it’s important to try new ideas (that still fit with the company’s values) in order to improve the culture. Some of them are general enough to apply to everyone.

Here are a few suggested strategies for cultivating a winning culture.

* Inspire a culture of being heard. Allow company owners or C-suite members to demonstrate a unique level of transparency and accessibility, perhaps even having them implement ideas that lower-level employees have suggested.

* Make a habit of having a culture of recognition. Organize corporate events that show all employees you understand the hard work they put in and the good work they do. Company awards ceremonies can be a fun example.

* Encourage a culture of family. Promote team bonding events on- and off-site. Don’t resort to cheesy cliche events. Facilitate events that encourage your employees to unwind and be social together as well as those that promote teamwork and creative thinking.

* Create a culture of unique benefits. One thing that a lot of younger candidates enjoy is variety. Applying this concept to the perks of the job means offering flexible benefit packages. For example, allow your employees to choose a half-day Friday one week and then a casual Friday on the next eligible week.

Don’t be afraid to get creative with these tactics or others. Creative workplaces are unique and make other people want to be a part of them.

Good corporate culture is cyclical

When your company has the hang of building and promoting a good culture in the workplace, it benefits every part of the employee lifecycle.

Happy employees will want to stay at your company longer, aiding retention and making succession planning a little less uncertain. Those happy employees help bring in new hires, who themselves become happy members of your workforce. Their enthusiasm and enjoyment leads them to refer friends, family, and acquaintances to you when they’re looking to make a career move, which also broadens your candidate base.

Not every workplace can be Google, but every company can strive to create a corporate culture that is enjoyable for current and prospective employees and builds productivity at the same time.

Want to have the time to run your business and work on improving or defining your culture? Contact us to learn more about what partnering with Paycor can do.


Sources: Kissmetrics, The Seattle Times, The Houston Chronicle, Harvard Business Review


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