How Managers Can Set Performance Goals For Employees
How Managers Can Set Performance Goals For Employees

How Managers Can Set Performance Goals For Employees

Only 35% of employees say they have clear performance goals. That’s bad news for employers because those goals are directly tied to employee engagement which affects business metrics such as client retention, profitability and growth.

In fact, a recent Gallup poll found engaged employees are 21% more productive than non-engaged employees. What would your business be willing to invest if they had a way to increase productivity 21%?

Setting goals for employees promotes engagement for associates and empowers managers to evaluate their individual team members on measurable, viable facts—not just by “feel.” Clearly defined goals increase the chance of success for both employees and their supervisors.

goal setting for employees

Here are five tips Paycor HR professionals recommend for powerful goal setting that can change the way your organization operates.

  1. Start with Your Goals
  2. As a manager, reflect on your own goals. Think about how they relate to your departmental goals and how they tie to your organization’s strategic goals overall. Be prepared to translate that to your team.

    Keep in mind, a good leader wants his/her team to do a better job. A great leader wants the team to be better people. It’s hard to lead people, so start by focusing on your own self. Be mindful of what you say, but more importantly, be mindful of what you do—your employees are watching.

  3. Connect Goals to Behaviors
  4. Identifying particular goals for an employee makes an evaluation more objective for both sides and removes ambiguity. Instead of making an assessment based on feelings or assumptions, focus on specifics like numbers, occasions and details so employees clearly understand the expectations and can work toward desired goals.

    Start with the end in mind. For example, you want your sales reps to schedule two appointments each week. So, identify two to three behaviors that are likely to result in reaching that outcome. Now the employee knows where he is expected to go as well as how to get there.

  5. Focus on Self Development
  6. Managers should challenge their employees to set both professional and personal goals. How you break it down is up to you and what works best for the employee’s job position. Maybe it’s best to set weekly or monthly goals. Perhaps quarterly will do. For professional goals, determine what is appropriate for the job, but try to also list at least one goal that’s tied to personal self-development.

    Personal goal setting leads to long-lasting change and promotes greater engagement with your organization and its mission. There are four important steps to establishing self-development goals for yourself and your employees:
    • Assess your current situation.
    • Take inventory of your interests.
    • Spot check with others.
    • Set specific actions.

  7. Use Documentation
  8. Be sure to document your goals in writing, both formally and informally. The formal process might include a standard form, a performance development plan or other assessment, specific timelines, checkpoints and occasional updates.

    Informal documentation might take the form of notes written from regular development conversations that support the formal process.

  9. Keep Goals Top of Mind
  10. It’s important to set goals annually at a minimum and then revisit them throughout the year for tweaking as necessary. Be sure to include a stretch goal—one that would be especially difficult yet extremely rewarding to attain.

Yes, goals are subject to change. Even so, take time to put them on paper. Consider creating a one-pager for each employee that lists the associate’s goals, personal-development strategies and the organization’s overall objectives. Place the one-pager in a spot that’s visible to the employee and refer to it during one-to-one meetings—not just during the annual performance evaluation period.

Goal setting and performance management are critical factors that support employee engagement. And an engaged workforce leads to improved products and services, happier customers, greater employee satisfaction and a better bottom line for your organization.

Paycor’s HR solutions enable employers to efficiently and effectively handle responsibilities like goal setting and performance management. Contact us to see how we can meet your HR needs.


hcm-software

Source: 1Paycor’s People Management Report: Perception vs. Reality

More to Discover

Taking the Guesswork out of Employee Pay - Part 1

Taking the Guesswork out of Employee Pay - Part 1

Deep Dive - External Equity and Market Pricing Feel more comfortable with how you determine employee pay at your company by learning how to align market pricing with your business strategy, understanding survey data and market pricing steps. Speakers: Christine Ippolito & Joanna Hall Christine Ippolito, SPHR, SHRM-SCP - Christine is the Founder and Principal of Compass Workforce Solutions, LLC, a consulting firm providing strategic human resource expertise to small businesses to reduce exposure and increase profitability. She has served clients in a leadership capacity for 25 years in multiple industries and environments within Fortune 250, venture capital and equity-backed companies, as well as privately held and family-owned...

Taking the Guesswork out of Employee Pay - Part 2

Taking the Guesswork out of Employee Pay - Part 2

Deep Dive - Creating Base Pay Structure to Achieve External and Internal Equity Take what you learned about market pricing in Part 1 to the next level in Part 2 of creating a base pay structure by learning the steps and considerations in building a base pay structure. You will learn the different approaches that may be used to build a base pay structure and how to maintain your base pay structure and evaluate for effectiveness. Speaker: Christine Ippolitto Christine Ippolito, SPHR, SHRM-SCP - Christine is the Founder and Principal of Compass Workforce Solutions, LLC, a consulting firm providing strategic human resource expertise to small businesses to reduce exposure and increase profitability. She has served clients in a leadership...

Understanding FMLA Regulations

Understanding FMLA Regulations

What is the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA?) The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is a federal law that allows eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave in any given 12-month period for certain medical and family reasons without fear of losing their job. Signed into law in 1993, the FMLA is designed to help employees balance their work and family responsibilities while promoting equal employment opportunity for men and women. Who is Eligible for FMLA? An employee is eligible for FMLA leave if he or she has worked for a covered employer at least 12 months, completed at least 1,250 hours of work during the past 12 months and worked at a location within 75 miles of where the company employs 50 or more people. Keep in...

The Turnover Crisis in Restaurants

The Turnover Crisis in Restaurants

An Action Plan for Owners and Operators Restaurants across the country are experiencing high volumes of turnover at an alarming rate. In 2016, turnover exceeded 70% for the second consecutive year, and the turnover rate in the fast-food industry reached 150%, the highest since data was first captured in 1995*. With record numbers of restaurants and more jobs to choose from, employees are willing to take risks to find the right fit. The demand for restaurant workers isn’t going away, so it’s critical to find the right HCM provider who can help solve your HR challenges with the right combination of technology and expertise. More than 3,000 restaurants across the country depend on Paycor to help onboard new hires, pay them accurately and...