How to Develop and Retain Your Employees Throughout Their Careers
How to Develop and Retain Your Employees Throughout Their Careers

How to Develop and Retain Your Employees Throughout Their Careers

With two out of three employees disengaged at work, today’s companies must deal with lower productivity, higher turnover costs and an overall decrease in growth. But it doesn’t take a lot of effort to produce big results: a 5% increase in employee engagement has been shown to lead to a 25-85 increase in profits.

Employee engagement is about everyday interactions with your employees that show them you care about their career. That’s why it’s so important to engage employees during every stage of their employment, from recruiting to onboarding to their day-to-day jobs. Here are three ways to develop, engage and retain your employees on an ongoing basis:

1. Recognize them for a job well done

Studies have shown that 58% of the difference between high and low employee performance is predicted by recognition. In addition, employees who receive recognition are seven times more likely to stay with the company. Recognition can be as simple as writing employees a message on their birthdays or work anniversaries, taking the time to say “thank you” for a job well done or sending them a handwritten note.

2. Review their performance and drive conversation

A formalized, consistent performance review process helps motivate career conversations and lets employees know their development is important to you. Having open conversations with employees about their job performance and career goals and offering constructive feedback increases their engagement.

3. Understand what makes them tick

Having the right employee data and analytics, such as reports on compensation, benefits, employee tenure, demographics and certifications, can help you better understand your workforce and allows you to make strategic decisions. In addition, having quick-and-easy access to employee information such as birthdays, children’s names or hobbies can enable you to engage with them on a more personal level.

For more guidance on engaging your employees throughout their career at your company, download the whitepaper *Employee Engagement: Why You Can’t Afford to Get it Wrong


Sources: Gallup’s State of the American Workforce Report, People Metrics Employee Engagement Report, Lizz Pellett, Bob Nelson

More to Discover

HR

Is Holiday Pay Mandatory In Your State?

Is Holiday Pay Mandatory In Your State?

The FLSA Only Requires Employers to Pay for Time Worked Unlike most of the European Union, the United States has no federal law requiring private companies to pay for national holiday time off (by law, all employees in the EU also get a minimum of 28 paid vacation days). The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires an employer to pay its employees only for time worked. This means that if an employee takes the day off for Christmas, you don’t have to pay them for time not worked. But Most Employers Offer Paid Holidays In practice, though, most private sector employers in the US give their employees the day off for national holidays, or they pay them time-and-a-half for working on the day. Some companies also offer a floating holiday,...

HR

The Different Types of Turnover

The Different Types of Turnover

Voluntary vs. Involuntary Turnover Regardless of business type there are two main types of employee turnover: voluntary and involuntary. Within each of those categories, however, you’ll find various reasons for why a company might have employee turnover. While the term “turnover” sometimes has a negative connotation, not all turnover is bad. For example, when a poorly performing employee is let go and replaced with someone who is motivated and excels at their job, productivity can soar. This new worker can bring bottom-line benefits, as well as provide an overall boost to team morale. What is involuntary turnover? Involuntary turnover includes layoffs or reductions in force and terminating poorly performing employees. The first type of...

Case Study: Cobb County Marietta Water Authority

Case Study: Cobb County Marietta Water Authority

With three disconnected HR systems, Cobb County Marietta Water Authority struggled with excessive data entry. Not only was this time consuming, it resulted in several errors each pay period, leading HR administrators to seek an integrated solution. “With Paycor, our employees never have to switch platforms, login to multiple systems, re-key information or open spreadsheets. By simplifying our everyday work processes we have time to focus on our mission.” - Allison Clements, Director of Finance, Cobb County Marietta Water Authority Paycor’s HR & Payroll solution gives CCMWA one location to process payroll and manage employee records. Instead of toggling between multiple screens, administrators can see a holistic view of data, reducing...

HR

Employees’ Rights for Jury Duty Leave

Employees’ Rights for Jury Duty Leave

Jury duty is foundational to our country’s judicial system. So, whether you’re in the, “Oh, no, I’ve got jury duty!” or the, “Awesome, I’ve got jury duty!” camp, as an employer, it’s important to understand the law. Your Responsibilities as an Employer Seem Clear Federal law does not require you to provide your employees leave for jury duty service nor does it provide for a specified period of leave, compensation or benefits. But it Gets Complicated Many states and municipalities prohibit employers from docking pay or paid time off when an employee is serving on a jury. Most of them also prohibit employers from firing or penalizing an employee for serving jury duty. And some states require you to pay an employee for time not worked as a...