How to File Taxes without a W-2
How to File Taxes without a W-2

How to File Taxes without a W-2

The deadline for employers to provide W-2 forms to their employees is January 31, 2019. But sometimes, for various reasons, employers do not provide W-2s. In some cases, a business has had to close its doors and has chosen not to pay for its former employees to receive W-2s. So, what’s a taxpayer to do?

  1. Try to get your W-2 for 2018 from your employer
  2. If January 31, 2019 has come and gone, attempt to get your W-2 from your employer. Speak to the company leadership and find out if it will provide W-2s to all employees. Even if the company is no longer in business, it can usually arrange for W-2s to be sent from its former payroll provider. If you are unable to get in touch with someone at the company, or if it refuses to provide W-2s, what is your next step? Many individuals will attempt to get their information from the company’s former payroll provider. But for security reasons, payroll companies are not allowed to discuss employee information with anyone who is not an authorized contact on the account.

  3. Try to get your W-2 from the IRS
  4. Your next step would be to ask the IRS for help finding your W-2. Contact the agency at 800.829.1040. Once you provide your personal information and your employer’s name and address, the IRS will try to find a copy of your W-2. Sometimes, the IRS may have received tax information from your employer even if you did not.

  5. Use Form 4852 and your last paystub to file income taxes
  6. Failing that, you can use IRS Form 4852 to file your tax return. Download Form 4852 from the IRS website and complete it using a copy of your last paystub. Once complete, attach Form 4852 to your 1040 or other tax form and send it to the IRS.

  7. File your income taxes on time
  8. Even if you have not yet received a W-2, you should still file your tax return on or before April 17, 2019.

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Source: Internal Revenue Service


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