Minimum Wage by State and 2019 Increases
Minimum Wage by State and 2019 Increases

Minimum Wage by State and 2019 Increases

Federal Minimum Wage 2019

For many medium-to-small sized organizations, managing the myriad of federal compliance regulations is a top challenge. In fact, a recent Paycor survey found that 42% of organizations have negative feelings about their compliance management practices. In most instances, compliance management falls squarely on HR’s shoulders, and with limited resources and understaffed departments, keeping up with the many changes that continue to impact the current landscape is a tall task. That challenge is becoming even more daunting with the recent rise in local and state mandates for regulations like paid sick leave, state tax changes, pay equity laws and minimum wage increases.

In 2019, nineteen states across the country will increase their minimum wage requirements for workers. In 2018, we saw Alaska, Florida, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, Ohio and South Dakota raised their rates based on cost of living, while eleven states, including Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington, raised their rates because of previously approved legislation or ballot initiatives.

To ensure your organization is aware of the latest minimum wage requirements, Paycor has created a breakdown by state.

State  2018 Minimum Wage  2019 Minimum Wage 
Alabama  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
Alaska  $9.84  $9.89 
Arizona  $10.50  $11.00 
Arkansas  $8.50  $9.25 
California   $11.00*  $12.00* 
Colorado  $10.20  $11.10 
Connecticut  $10.10  $10.10 
Delaware  $8.25 $8.75 (current); $9.25 (effective October 1, 2019) 
Washington D.C.  $13.25  $14.00 
Florida  $8.25  $8.46 
Georgia  $5.15 (Employers subject to Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the federal minimum wage.)  $5.15 (Employers subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the $7.25 Federal minimum wage) 
Hawaii  $10.10  $10.10 
Idaho  $7.25  $7.25 
Illinois  $8.25  $8.25 
Indiana  $7.25  $7.25 
Iowa  $7.25  $7.25 
Kansas  $7.25  $7.25 
Kentucky  $7.25  $7.25 
Louisiana  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
Maine  $10.00  $11.00 
Maryland  $10.10  $10.10 
Massachusetts  $11.00  $12.00 
Michigan  $9.25  $9.45
Minnesota  $9.65**  $9.65** 
Mississippi  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
Missouri  $7.85  $8.60 
Montana  $8.30  $8.50 
Nebraska  $9.00  $9.00 
Nevada  $8.25  $7.25*** 
New Hampshire  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
New Jersey  $8.60  $8.85 
New Mexico  $7.50  $7.50 
New York  $10.40  $11.10**** (statewide) 
North Carolina  $7.25  $7.25 
North Dakota  $7.25  $7.25 
Ohio  $8.30  $8.55 
Oklahoma  $7.25  $7.25 
Oregon  $10.25  $11.25**** 
Pennsylvania  $7.25  $7.25 
Rhode Island  $10.10  $10.50 
South Carolina  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
South Dakota  $8.65  $9.10 
Tennessee  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
Texas  $7.25  $7.25 
Utah  $7.25  $7.25 
Vermont  $10.50  $10.78 
Virginia  $7.25  $7.25 
Washington  $11.50  $12.00 
West Virginia  $8.75  $8.75 
Wisconsin  $7.25  $7.25 
Wyoming  $5.15 (Employers subject to Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the federal minimum wage.)  $5.15 (Employers subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the $7.25 Federal minimum wage) 


*$12.00 rate is for California employers with 26 or more employees. Employers in California with 25 or less employees have a minimum wage of $11.00 per hour.

**$9.86 rate is for large employers. Small employers have a minimum wage of $8.04 per hour.

***$7.25 rate is for Nevada employees who are offered health insurance. $8.25 rate is for Nevada employees who are not offered health insurance.

****Statewide minimum wages apply in areas that are not governed by a higher, local minimum wage ordinance. New York City and Portland Metro are examples of areas which have local minimum wage rates that exceed the statewide minimum.

For nearly 30 years, Paycor has been guiding our clients through big changes to federal, state, and local taxes as well as compliance. We do it through a combination of expert advice and smart, automatically updated payroll software. Plus, our Resource Center provides the latest compliance updates, industry trends, thought leadership and best practices to help organizations achieve their vision and reach their potential.

Paycor is not a legal, tax, benefit, accounting or investment advisor. All communication from Paycor should be confirmed by your company’s legal, tax, benefit, accounting or investment advisor before making any decisions.

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