Tips to Help Your Clients Prepare for 2018
Tips to Help Your Clients Prepare for 2018

Tips to Help Your Clients Prepare for 2018

We’re quickly approaching the end of the year, so now is the time for your clients to start thinking hard about their businesses in 2018. Are they hiring new employees, looking to control benefit/labor costs… maybe they’re considering taking their business to the next level? With all of that to think about, now is also the time for you to start having the conversations with your clients and prospects to share valuable information to help them make their 2018 successful. Here are four areas where you can provide your expert advice:

Open Enrollment

With the majority of open enrollments beginning this month, it’s important that your clients have their benefits programs integrated with their payroll and time systems. If they don’t today, it might be too late for action this year, but you can get them started on the right path for next year. When their employees are enabled to make elections at their own convenience, and changes are automatically updated within payroll, your clients will save time and greatly reduce the chance of error. That’s a win for everyone!

Focus on Employee Engagement

With a mere 33% of U.S. employees indicating that they’re engaged at work, something needs to be done to boost that number. Unengaged employees can have a negative impact on the workforce and an entire organization. So, while foosball tables in the office and happy hours after work can be fun, your clients also need to provide their employees with the tools they need to function better at work.

Empowerment to the People!

Especially in changing environments—such as growing companies—employees crave a sense of control. For example, implementing self-reviews as part of the evaluation process and conducting (and acting upon) employee surveys provide a voice for the workforce. Similarly, some HR technologies (like Paycor’s Perform HR feature self-service options that give employees the keys to their personal information, letting them make changes as needed, check their compensation and benefits data, request time off or view balances, and connect with other employees.

Improving Onboarding

Do your clients’ new hires get a warm welcome on day one or a giant stack of paperwork? An electronic onboarding program enables new employees to contribute more quickly, getting them started on pursuing their passions sooner, increasing their engagement, and helping your bottom line. Employee self-service can enable new hires to complete their onboarding paperwork—like their I-9 form—and sign company documents before their first day.

Making simple changes to their processes and procedures as outlined above can help your clients save time and money and help ensure their employees stay happy and productive.

Helping our partners get the most out of our service so you can enable your clients to keep ahead of the curve is key to your success and ours. In this competitive market, let’s talk about how we can improve your clients’ ability to attract top talent, as well as improve their existing employees’ engagement. Click here to refer a client today.

Sources: 2017 State of the American Workplace, Gallup

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