To Avoid an HR and Payroll Implementation Nightmare, Ask ONE Question
To Avoid an HR and Payroll Implementation Nightmare, Ask ONE Question

To Avoid an HR and Payroll Implementation Nightmare, Ask ONE Question

HR and payroll technology affect every aspect of your business, so if your current provider isn’t meeting your needs, your entire organization suffers. And yet so many business leaders settle for mediocre HCM because they’re (legitimately) afraid of implementing a new system. The good news: you can avoid an implementation nightmare by asking one simple question:

Is My HCM Partner Collaborative?

How can you tell if you’re working with a collaborative HCM company? It’s easy. Ask yourself: Do they talk more than they listen? If so, they probably aren’t taking the time to understand the particulars of your business, which is the root cause of most implementation nightmares.

Related Article: 5 Questions to Ask Before Implementing a New Payroll and HR System

A Collaborative Partner Will:

Devote dedicated resources to you. Whether it’s a single implementation specialist or a team, an HCM provider who commits resources specifically to your project is another good sign.

Bring expertise to the table. For example, does your implementation team understand the compliance and tax laws specific to your industry and region?

Over-communicate. Nothing about the implementation process should come as a surprise. You should be involved in creating the schedule for your implementation–including the go-live date—and base it around what time of the year works best for your organization. Once the schedule is created, you should receive status calls and/or emails to keep you updated on what’s happening. At no point should you feel like you’re “in the dark.”

Looking for a collaborative HCM partner? Check out what makes Paycor different than your current HR and payroll provider.


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