Minimum Wage by State and 2020 Increases
Minimum Wage by State and 2020 Increases

Minimum Wage by State and 2020 Increases

Changes to minimum wages in 2020 are here.

For many medium-to-small sized organizations, managing the myriad of federal compliance regulations is a top challenge. In fact, a recent Paycor survey found that 42% of organizations have negative feelings about their compliance management practices. In most instances, compliance management falls squarely on HR’s shoulders, and with limited resources and understaffed departments, keeping up with the many changes that continue to impact the current landscape is a tall task. That challenge is becoming even more daunting with the recent rise in local and state mandates for regulations like paid sick leave, state tax changes, pay equity laws and minimum wage increases.

In 2020, a total of twenty-four states across the country will increase their minimum wage requirements for workers. Beginning on January 1, 2020, twenty states increased wages with Connecticut, Delaware, Nevada and Oregon set to increase their requirements later in the year.

To ensure your organization is aware of the latest minimum wage requirements, Paycor has created a breakdown by state.

State  2019 Minimum Wage  2020 Minimum Wage 
Alabama  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
Alaska  $9.89  $10.19 
Arizona  $11.00  $12.00 
Arkansas  $9.25  $10.00 
California   $12.00*  $13.00* 
Colorado  $11.10  $12.00 
Connecticut  $11.00  $11.00 ($12.00 effective 9/1/20) 
Delaware  $9.25 $9.25 
Washington D.C.  $14.00  $14.00 ($15.00 effective 7/1/20) 
Florida  $8.46  $8.56 
Georgia  $5.15 (Employers subject to Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the $7.25 Federal minimum wage.)  $5.15 (Employers subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the $7.25 Federal minimum wage) 
Hawaii  $10.10  $10.10 
Idaho  $7.25  $7.25 
Illinois  $8.25  $9.25 
Indiana  $7.25  $7.25 
Iowa  $7.25  $7.25 
Kansas  $7.25  $7.25 
Kentucky  $7.25  $7.25 
Louisiana  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
Maine  $11.00  $12.00 
Maryland  $10.10  $11.00 
Massachusetts  $12.00  $12.75 
Michigan  $9.45  $9.65
Minnesota  $9.86**  $10.00** 
Mississippi  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
Missouri  $8.60  $9.45 
Montana  $8.50  $8.65 
Nebraska  $9.00  $9.00 
Nevada  $7.25***  $7.25*** 
New Hampshire  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
New Jersey  $10.00  $11.00 
New Mexico  $7.50  $9.00 
New York  $11.10  $11.80**** (statewide) 
North Carolina  $7.25  $7.25 
North Dakota  $7.25  $7.25 
Ohio  $8.55  $8.70 
Oklahoma  $7.25  $7.25 
Oregon  $11.25****  $11.25**** 
Pennsylvania  $7.25  $7.25 
Rhode Island  $10.50  $10.50 
South Carolina  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
South Dakota  $9.10  $9.30 
Tennessee  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum)  $7.25 (Federal, no state minimum) 
Texas  $7.25  $7.25 
Utah  $7.25  $7.25 
Vermont  $10.78  $10.96 
Virginia  $7.25  $7.25 
Washington  $12.00  $13.50 
West Virginia  $8.75  $8.75 
Wisconsin  $7.25  $7.25 
Wyoming  $5.15 (Employers subject to Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the Federal minimum wage.)  $5.15 (Employers subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act must pay the $7.25 Federal minimum wage) 


*$13.00 rate is for California employers with 26 or more employees. Employers in California with 25 or less employees have a minimum wage of $12.00 per hour.

**$10.00 rate is for large employers. Small employers have a minimum wage of $8.15 per hour.

***$7.25 rate is for Nevada employees who are offered health insurance. $8.25 rate is for Nevada employees who are not offered health insurance. On July 1, 2020, the minimum wage for employees with health insurance will increase to $8.00. The minimum wage for employees without health insurance will increase to $9.00.

****Statewide minimum wages apply in areas that are not governed by a higher, local minimum wage ordinance. New York City and Portland Metro are examples of areas which have local minimum wage rates that exceed the statewide minimum.

For nearly 30 years, Paycor has been guiding our clients through big changes to federal, state and local taxes as well as compliance. Check out our Resource Center for the latest compliance updates, industry trends, thought leadership and best practices to help organizations achieve their vision and reach their potential.

Paycor is not a legal, tax, benefit, accounting or investment advisor. All communication from Paycor should be confirmed by your company’s legal, tax, benefit, accounting or investment advisor before making any decisions.

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