Overtime Rule Changes: The Essential Employer Conversation Guide
Overtime Rule Changes: The Essential Employer Conversation Guide

Overtime Rule Changes: The Essential Employer Conversation Guide

Employers are beginning to prepare for final Department of Labor (DOL) overtime changes that will affect salaried exempt employees earning $47,476 or less per year.

As employers consider reclassifying employees and potentially changing compensation or hours worked, their ability to communicate effectively with affected employees will have a major impact on their organization.

Download Paycor’s Essential Employer Conversation Guide to help manage challenging conversations with affected employees.


_DOL RULES UPDATE
On November 22, a U.S. District ruled in favor of an injunction blocking the final overtime rules from being implemented on December 1, 2016. At this time, we are awaiting more information on updates to the rule and the final implementation date.

If you have implemented changes already, we recommend businesses not change any plans, pay structures, or policies that have been updated._

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