Switching to Paycor 101
Switching to Paycor 101

Switching to Paycor 101

You’ve evaluated your choices and you’ve chosen Paycor as your new provider…now what? Changing payroll and HR providers can be a lot of work for any business. We make the transition smooth and easy to get your new payroll, HR and time systems up and running quickly.

The Implementation Process

As you prepare to switch to Paycor, your biggest question might be, “How does the process work?” Each new Paycor client is partnered with an individual implementation consultant to guide you through the process. But just so you have an idea, here are the five basic steps in the implementation process:

# Implementation meeting
Your Paycor implementation consultant meets with you to set a transition schedule, gather data and discuss the specifications for your configuration.
# Database configuration and verification
We review and input your company and employee information, going through it line by line to ensure accuracy. We also configure the application based on your company’s needs and policies.
# Training
You have two options for training: instructor-led online sessions for all products or live, classroom training that provides hands-on practice in the payroll application at locations nationwide. After you’ve made the switch, free ongoing training is also available to you through Paycor Academy. You can also find videos and job aids on specific questions by clicking on the Help button within the product. And remember, you can always call your dedicated Paycor specialist.
# Testing
We perform a parallel payroll run and compare it side-by-side with your previous system to verify that everything is correct. If you’re using one of our time and attendance products, you’ll also do a “test punch” where your employees can test out the software, using it to clock in and out.
# Go live!
With all of the data double-checked for correctness and your training complete, you’re ready to process your first payroll with Paycor!

Advice from an Expert

Implementation Project Manager Mike Stafford had this advice for companies preparing to switch to a new provider: “Use the transition as an opportunity to change anything that needs changing, and be decisive and explicit about what changes you’d like to make.” Examples of changes include organizational structure, deductions and internal processes. For instance, if you’ve been thinking about assigning employees to a new department or reorganizing your process for submitting payroll, the transition would be a good time to make those changes.

Another suggestion from Mike was, “I would highly recommend attending and taking good notes during training. We know it’s not your full-time job to manage this transition, but we notice that clients who are engaged throughout the training process feel more prepared and more comfortable using their applications.”

Learn more about our small business and large business employee administration solutions that can help you manage your people better, or contact us to get started today.

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